U2′s Songs of Innocence

U2 released its thirteenth album Songs of Innocence for free on Apple’s iTunes service today.

 

U2′s decision echoes the free digital download strategy used previously by Nine Inch Nails (The Slip) and Radiohead (In Rainbows). My 2008 conference paper and presentation slides found that each band adopted the strategy during a period of heightened conflict with their labels, and leveraged their audiences to negotiate better contracts.

 

U2′s espoused reason for the strategy is to raise global awareness of specific charities. Other reasons may emerge . . .

11th April 2012: Supafest Fallout Lessons

P Diddy signing at hmv 150 Oxford Street, London, 2011

 

Australia’s urban music festival Supafest is in trouble. Co-headliner Missy Elliott claims she wasn’t actually on the Supafest bill. Co-headliner P Diddy was also axed and counter-claimed on Twitter that the festival organisers had never paid him or fulfilled the contract. Elliott and Diddy mobilised their Facebook and Twitter followers to contact Supafest, which did not reply.

 

The fallout from Supafest has several lessons for the winner-takes-all economy. Both artists leveraged their social media contingent as pressure in a negotiation situation. This is similar to how merger arbitrageurs make strategic leaks to the financial media during hostile acquisition attempts. The fallout also illustrates two fundamental strategies of effective artist management. Diddy’s strategy is to walk away from Supafest unless the necessary and sufficient conditions of the contract negotiations are met. This preserves his market-making power as a superstar. Elliott’s strategy is to protect her branding and to ‘shift the blame’ to Supafest’s organisers for what she claims is misleading advertising. Elliott claims this occurred because of a breakdown in negotiations with Supafest. Effective artist management looks for the upside and breakout opportunities, and hedges the talent from exploitative and loss-making situations. Just ask U2.

 

Photo: hmvgetcloser/Flickr.

29th May 2009: What Researchers Can Learn From Brian Eno

For anyone attending Sydney’s Luminous Festival curated by musician/producer Brian Eno, some lessons for researchers:

 

1. Develop a longer-term view for your body of work/research program: Eno’s 40-year career demonstrates how creativity, foresight and role plularity may underpin a body of work or research program. Eno’s career spans several phases: early Roxy Music, a solo career which popularised ambient music and generative art, and as a producer on breakthrough albums by David Bowie, David Byrne, Talking Heads, and U2 (sorry, Coldplay doesn’t count). For most people, helming any one of the following projects would be enough: Talking Heads’ Remain In Light (1980); U2′s The Unforgettable Fire (1984), The Joshua Tree (1987) and Achtung Baby (1991); or David Bowie’s epochal ‘Berlin trilogy’ of Low (1977), Heroes (1977) and Lodger (1979). Eno’s hit rate and cultural influence suggests he has a greater embodied awareness. For an overview, see David Sheppard’s recent biography On a Faraway Beach (Orion Books, London, 2008).

 

2. Develop a self-mastery of technique: As the creator of ambient music and generative art, Eno is frequently portrayed as a Renaissance-style creative mastermind with adaptive intent. Two more informed examples are Eric Tamm’s PhD thesis and Elspeth McFadzean’s study (‘What We Can Learn From Creative People? The Story of Brian Eno’, Management Science journal, 38:1, 2000, pp. 51-56). Eno’s diary A Year With Swollen Appendices (Faber & Faber, London, 1996) illustrates the emotional strength; attitude to funding, project and organisational constraints; and granularity of focus that a research program needs in the face of adversity.

 

3. Honour chance and luck: The ‘Law of Accident’ plays an aleatory, randomised role in many of Eno’s most influential creations: the car accident which led to the ambient music experiments for Discreet Music (1975), the Frippertronics tape delay experiments which resulted in Eno and Robert Fripp’s album No Pussyfooting (1972), and the oracular deck Oblique Strategies (1975) created with the late painter Peter Schmidt. This period shows the value of a disposition for action that is informed by conceptual depth; rapid, iterative development for strategy execution; and quasi-experimental methods with collaborators that fail fast and leverage upside risk. Eno continues this line of development with the art installation 77 Million Paintings (2006).

 

4. Build a network of collaborators and mentors: Eno’s collaborators range from David Bowie, David Byrne and U2 to journeymen producers Daniel Lanois and Robert Fripp. This network enabled Eno to transition from Roxy Music to a solo career, and then as an in-demand producer (where word of mouth and past credits are the equivalent of academic publications and grants). As recounted in Simon Reynolds‘ history of New Wave innovation, Rip It Up And Start Again (Faber & Faber, London, 2005), Eno also became a mentor and subcultural curator in the late 1970s to New York’s ‘No Wave’ scene and artists such as Devo and Talking Heads. Many of these artists and producers would become influential in their own right, rather than followers of an Eno aesthetic. Of course, sometimes things can go wrong: the rest of Talking Heads blamed Eno’s production as one of the catalysts for vocalist David Byrne’s decision to leave the band. More recently, Eno has leveraged his ‘public intellectual’ status to promote John Brockman’s Edge salon and The Long Now Foundation.